MustHaveMenus Blog

Category: ‘Tips & Tricks’

5 Foodie Vocab Words You Should Know

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Foodie might be an overused word right now, but it’s still one to wear as a badge of honor. Legendary chef and food lover Julia Child summed it up perfectly: “People who love to eat are always the best people.” And being the best means having a truly confident culinary vocabulary! Here are 5 foodie words to know, so you can keep your menu masterful.

Aioli
An oldie but a goodie, aioli has been around since the late 1800s in Mediterranean fare. More recently, it has captured the imagination of modern chefs, who include it on their menus with everything from onion rings to prime cuts of steak. There is some debate among culinary purists about the accurate recipe for aioli; the name itself means “oil and garlic” but the inclusion of egg yolks and lemon juice is common. While many aiolis contain other flavoring, the truest version of aioli contains no seasoning other than garlic.

Cynar
A liqueur made from cynani (the bitter chemical found in artichokes) may seem unorthodox, but like Amaro or any other Italian herbal liqueur, the benefits of this brew outweigh any weirdness. No stranger to versatility, Cynar is often mixed with orange juice and can be enjoyed as an àperitif, cocktail, or digestive. For mixed drinks, this liqueur offers a full flavor profile with a sweet honey beginning before the herbal finish. Low alcohol content also means that Cynar adds flavor without packing a strong punch. Salute!

Ghee
Pronounced with a hard G (like “gift”), ghee is a trending alternative to standard butter. Ghee is a “clarified butter” prepared by simmering butter to separate the milk solids. The fat becomes caramelized which results in a nutty flavor. Popular as a component of South Asian and Arabic menus, ghee has become internationally prized for its low smoke point and used as a substitute for vegetable oil in many recipes. Not only is ghee shelf stable, it is also lactose free and has many health benefits!

Plantain
A close sibling of the banana, the plantain is becoming an increasingly popular ingredient for tasty restaurant fare. Served cooked, plantains resemble green bananas but are often smaller and have a thicker skin that can appear black when ripened. As fruits go, this one is very low in sugar and has a starchy, durable texture that can be used to great effect in both sweet and savory dishes.

Ube (Purple Yam)
This sweet tuber is currently taking the culinary world by storm and starting to appear on menus around the world. Hailing from Filipino and Indian cooking, the purple yam is used in a variety of desserts for both its flavor and rich, natural color. One of the most popular uses for ube in the Philippines is in Halo-Halo (Haluhalo), a dessert served in a tall glass featuring shaved ice, evaporated milk, coconut, nuts, and fruit.

3 Tips for Delicious Do-It-Yourself Food Photography

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Taking delicious food photography is fairly easy if you set time aside and follow these three steps. Start with some simple dishes and work your way to the more complex. Promote them on social media, on your website or takeout ordering.

USE A SINGLE LIGHT SOURCE

Using a single light source will help you control where the highlights and shadows fall. Natural light from a window is best. You want to avoid direct sunlight, as that will cast very hard shadows and blow out the highlight areas or, what is referred to in the industry, hot spots. An overcast day provides optimum light, as it is filtered by the clouds. So don’t be afraid of shooting when the sun is hidden.

Place your surface within a couple of feet of the light source. Start putting your props (plate, napkin, etc.) onto the surface to begin to create the composition of your shot. This is your “set.” Do not put any food on the plate yet. You are going to make sure you have everything the way you intend before adding the food. There are two reasons for this: first, you do not want the food to look spoiled, wilted or dried out. Second, you will not be able to see how the light is being affected.

Use a 20" x 30" foam core fill card to bounce light into the shadow areas.

Use a 20″ x 30″ foam core fill card to bounce light into the shadow areas.

USE A FILL CARD

Though you are using a single light source, you will want to fill in the shadows. The best way to accomplish this is not with another light but with a fill card to “bounce” light from your single light source onto your subject matter. This will provide an overall balance. Your fill card should be about the length of your surface. Start with featuring one dish at a time before tackling a buffet. A good size fill card to begin with should measure 20” x 30.” The best material is foam core. It is lightweight and can be purchased at a local craft or stationery store (Staples or Office Depot).

Depending upon the time of day and the angle of the light coming in from the window, you may need to adjust the angle of your fill card from (for example) 90 degrees to 45 degrees. Put something heavy enough to lean the fill card against so it remains in place. You may need a second pair of hands to hold the card a bit higher or at a precarious angle, while you shoot the photo.

Start with stand-ins before switching out with your “hero” dish.

Start with stand-ins before switching out with your “hero” dish.

USE A STAND-IN, NOT THE “HERO”

Be sure you have two matching plates or at least two of similar color. You will be putting your “stand-in” food on one plate to set your lighting. Put a sampling of the various types of food that will be on the plate so you will be able to adjust accordingly. (For example, cauliflower is a very light color compared to kale, which is very dark.) Have an idea of just how much food will be on the plate. Too little can make your portions look small for the price, too much can make it unappealing. That is why a stand-in is a good idea.

Once you have everything in place: distance from the light source, fill card angle and height, and how close up or far away you want to be from your subject, go ahead and prepare your hero plate. Do not prepare your hero plate on the set. Don’t be afraid to rearrange the food once you bring it back to the set. Any sauces or garnish should be added on the set seconds before you take your final shot so they will look fresh. Focus directly on the subject for crisp images. Take a few versions so you can choose the best. Try rotating the plate in case it offers a better perspective. And voila! 

Stand-in without a fill card.

Stand-in without a fill card.

Final hero shot.

Final hero shot.

4 Simple Tips to Increase Customer Retention

marketing BLOG image_5.25.16Retaining a customer is a lot easier and less expensive than attracting a new one. Once diners are in your seat, give them the opportunity to talk up your restaurant to their social network of friends before they even pay their bill. The potential reach can be priceless when raving fans spread the word for you.

Here are four enticing tips to engage with your customers:

1. Get Creative with Collateral

Give your customers something to hold their attention between putting down their menu and picking up a fork, such as an eye-catching table tent promoting an upcoming event or a menu insert containing interesting highlights or factoids about your restaurant’s humble beginnings. And before they head out the door, make sure they have souvenirs they can take with them—a check presenter insert with a special offer to encourage a repeat visit, a nicely designed loyalty program card or prominently-displayed takeout menus with your social media handles.  

2. Solicit Social Sharing

Invite your diners to snap a pic of their meal to share via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat. Invent a theme and create a #hashtag to engage a stream of comments. Or, get specific by tailoring a social media campaign.  Located in a college town neighborhood? Dive into Snapchat. Distribute custom coasters to promote your restaurant’s snapcode. Invite diners to follow your stories and ask them to snap back drool-worthy photos of their favorite menu items for a chance to win rewards, coupons and VIP invites to special events.

3. Openly Ask for Opinions

Since everyone has one (an opinion, that is), casually ask if the new charcuterie plate won them over or if the suggested pinot grigio complemented the clams, while their experience is still fresh.  Even if they enjoyed the atmosphere and the food, solicit ideas to help make their next dinner outing even more memorable.

4. Promptly Respond to Feedback

When customers leave feedback on Yelp, TripAdvisor, Urbanspoon and other social outlets, be sure to respond in a timely manner. Let them know you value their comments, whether positive or negative. The attention will keep your customers around for the long run, and could even turn a negative comment into a glowing review.

Repeat customers are a restaurant’s bread and butter, typically providing the majority of revenue for businesses and the bases for building loyalty. Loyal customers come back more frequently, bring their friends, spend more per visit, and voluntarily promote your restaurant, becoming the best brand ambassadors you could hope for.

6 Tips for Creating a Profitable Menu

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Marylise Tauzia, VP of Marketing of Revel Systems, offers six strategies for creating a tasty, profitable menu. Revel Systems offers a full-featured point of sale system that is cloud-based and made specifically for the iPad.

With spring and summer fast approaching it’s important to have ideas for an enticing menu on deck. If you are in the midst of opening a new restaurant or quick-service eatery, you’ll definitely want to be able to appeal to anyone who walks in for a bite. And your menu is a primary revenue driver.  

Even if you’ve been operating successfully for years, keep things fresh with new menu items or modifications to favorites to reflect seasonal options. MustHaveMenus has hundreds of menu designs with tons of features to help you enhance menu choices, specials and favorites. We see LOTS of menus, of course, so here are a few guidelines to get you going.

1. Strategically Selecting Menu Items

Striking a balance between offering the most tasty dishes and drinks and maximizing profit should be your top priority when creating your menu. You’ll want to identify which items are the most profitable and make sure that you have a strategy for promoting them. You might want to spice up your beloved, fancy grilled-cheese sandwich by adding goat horn peppers, but you’ll need to be sure that you’re tracking cost-effectiveness and the portion for each sandwich. There’s a lot that goes into the backend of menu creation, and an intelligent point-of-sale system with reporting and ingredient tracking can step in and help you measure profitability.

2. Highlight Menu Categories or Specialty Items  

Layout of your menu can have a huge influence over what customers order. Now that you’ve created a strategy for your menu items, you’ll want to design your menu to draw attention to certain items. Thoughtful menu design is imperative not only to your business’s branding, but also to the bottom-line. It may be that you don’t want people to miss the entrees or even a “dinner for two” special. Or perhaps you want to create a box for designated seasonal specialty options so that you can simply rotate them easily throughout the year. Regardless of your intention, highlighted boxes around a category or option will ensure that attention is directed to that point on the menu.

3. Organize Your Menu By Popularity

It’s always a good idea to sort your menu by your most popular items. Your repeat customers are looking for their favorites, and your word-of-mouth, new customers are going to be curious about those items. Like highlighting specials or seasonal items, sorting each category according to best sellers, and then organizing your menu visually so that most popular categories are easy to find. Most people tend to scan menus and land at the top-right corner, which is where you’ll want to place the items you don’t want customers to miss.

4. Use Relative Pricing

We won’t call this a “trick”…. But one way to give your customers more perspective in comparing menu items that seem more expensive than others is to put items more similarly prices in proximity to one another. For example, a halibut entree for $26 doesn’t seem so expensive when followed by a more comparatively priced $30 T-Bone steak, rather than a $15 pot-pie. Relative pricing may seem manipulative but everything has a context so it’s a good idea to establish the context of your menu.

5. Make specialty menu items available only certain days of the week

This is a great way to drive traffic to your restaurant on some of the slower nights. Maybe Wednesdays are the only nights the chef makes his great-grandmother’s secret puff pastry beef stew. For example, Georgetown Cupcakes in Washington, D.C. only offers their Red Velvet cupcake on Wednesdays. They have a line down the block just for that flavor. Other flavors are limited to certain days, as well. It keeps the customers coming back.

6. Highlight an area of the menu just for food sensitivities

With dietary restrictions or preferences on the rise, it’s important to give special diets a place on your menu. Just a decade ago, gluten-intolerance levels were at 1 in 2500 worldwide. Today, it’s at 1 in 133. That’s a significant jump and indicator that food sensitivities shouldn’t be ignored on your menu. Offering items that are dairy or gluten free will ensure that everyone who walks into your establishment has options. Even if your theme is old fashioned barbecue, you can still offer sides that will accommodate certain diets and even a meat or gluten alternative entree.


If you want a design specialist to handle the creative side of your menu our MHM Design Services team can highlight profitable specialty items and other menu features starting at $199.

7 Ways to Guarantee A Great Restaurant Brand Experience

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These are the seven variables by which your restaurant brand is accessed. It’s important to keep in mind that your brand is not what you think it is but what your customers think it is—from the moment they walk in the door, the welcoming they receive, the choices on the menu and the food they ingest to the surrounding ambiance. The ultimate goal is to earn loyal customers who can trust that their experience is a repeatable one.

Revel in your unique identity. 
Before you decide to base the theme of your restaurant on food alone, ask yourself, “What story are we trying to tell?” People love to get behind passion about one’s heritage or fulfilling a lifelong dream. Do you want to share your mother’s Italian cooking? Are you a celebrity (even if just in your small community)? Or maybe you want to be the best little Sandwich Cafe in town. Whatever you decided, leverage it every way you can—the name of your restaurant, the interior decor, and the theme of your menu design. Engage customers by telling your story on social media and providing a link to your online menu. Check out some additional helpful tips on boosting your brand on Menu Shoppe’s blog. 

Greet customers quickly and courteously.
Immediate acknowledgement is important. If your host/hostess is on the phone taking a reservation, preventing them from making a proper introduction and greeting, they can still make eye contact and smile or cover the phone to say a quick,
“I’ll be right with you.” As soon as they can, they should thank the customer for coming to your establishment, Thank you for coming to Sendar’s Restaurant, I’m Rebecca. Will you be joining us for dinner? Customers appreciate being greeted, especially when it is sincere. Besides, both you and the customer are aware they could’ve selected that other restaurant.  

Train staff on image.
93% of how we are perceived—and how we perceive others—is based on body language. This involuntary, nonverbal assessment occurs every time we enter a new situation. Because the spoken word accounts for only 7% towards influencing their perception, you’ll want the first person your customer comes in contact with to pass the initial non-verbal scrutiny filter: appearance and body language.

Train your staff to be aware of not only their own body language, but also how to interpret non-verbal cues from customers; are they pausing too long when the host/hostess informs them there are no window tables available? Do they look away or purse their lips? Being quick to suggest enjoying a glass of wine at the bar, if they’re not in a hurry, will often quell their disappointment. Be willing to make it a complimentary glass of wine if it will help make the rest of their evening a positive experience.

Be consistent from the door to the dining table.
The customer will notice the details you attend to as equally as those you missed. What ambiance are you creating? If it’s quiet and intimate then you want to be sure that when your server pulls out a chair, the legs won’t scrape on the floor, disrupting the very atmosphere you aim to provide. Is the music in line with the setting you are trying to create? Is it too loud? Err on the side of too soft. Are your menus inviting to pick up and peruse? Are they inside a genuine leather menu cover or a café style menu cover? Whether your customers are coming to engage in social interaction at a pub or looking for an intimate dining experience, you want to deliver better than they expected.

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Menu Shoppe’s genuine leather menu covers.

Accommodate your customers.
Let’s face it, we all have our likes and dislikes. Add to the mix food allergies, dietary restrictions, vegan diets, and the latest food trends, it can seem like a lot to address. Providing easy replacements for sides and sauces will let your customers know you are flexible and willing. Be open to their suggestions for future substitutions and tell them you will gladly pass them on to the chef. You might even consider highlighting a “special substitutions” section on your menu. Most people committed to their health and dietary regime don’t mind paying a premium for quality choices. They may also feel embarrassed calling attention to their food issues by asking a litany of questions.

Provide intuitive service.
Naturally, your servers’ mannerisms might be more familiar with regulars than with new customers. And the degree of server interaction will vary between serving a couple having a romantic dinner as opposed to a table of conference colleagues. From the pacing of the meal, how frequently your server checks in, down to filling the water glasses before the customer asks, timing is key. It’ll make the difference between an exceptional experience and a satisfactory one.

Show your gratitude.
Gratuity goes both ways. Encourage your servers to ask questions before putting the check on the table. When the customer looks at the total it represents the dollar value of their dining experience. And that is the best time to show your gratitude by thanking them for choosing your restaurant and that you hope to see them again. Include a comment card that won’t require too much time to fill out. Make sure other staff acknowledge customers with a smile or a “thank you” on their way out. Gratitude is golden. 

Take the first step towards creating a brand identity that you can revel in, your menu. Our Design Services can help customize one you’ll absolutely love!

You’ve Got Online Ordering – Now Get More Orders!

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You’re an ahead-of-the-curve restaurateur. You understand the importance of a strong online presence for your restaurant. You also know that a whole new generation of guests will want to do more and more with your business online, including ordering takeout and delivery from the web.

You have everything you need to succeed:

  • A streamlined, mobile-friendly website
  • The MustHaveMenus Online Ordering app installed
  • Any specials or promotions applied to your online ordering menu

And yet, you still haven’t received your first online order. Or maybe you’re just not getting as many as you’d like. It turns out, there’s a couple of important factors that can increase your business – and the most important one is letting your customers know what you’re offering!

1. Turn your takeout menu into a sales force
One of the easiest ways to let your guests know that you have online ordering is to add a small note on your takeout menu. Use the footer space, or even the front panel to announce this exciting new option!

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2. Post about it on social media

Your guests have liked you on Facebook and followed you on Twitter – they love your food, they love your atmosphere, and they want to be the first ones to know about anything new. So don’t leave them in the dark – post a link to your online ordering page, and do it often!

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3. Update your voicemail message

One simple and very effective way to let your customers know about online ordering is to add it to your voicemail message or your on-hold message (if you have one). That way, if your customers call in after hours or when you’re busy, they’ll automatically find out that they don’t even need to call for takeout anymore – they can just go to your website!

 

These are three simple actions you can take to increase online orders for your business. To learn about even more marketing ideas, just click here. Need some help getting started with online ordering? Give us a call at 800-452-2234 or contact us here. We’re excited to work with you, and help you boost your business!

3 Things to Do to Improve the Dining Experience

Extensive series in a barbeque restaurant.  Multi-ethnic group includes Caucasian, African American and Indian models.  Friends having fun, and a family as well.

When you run a restaurant, you’re not just in the business of feeding people. You’re in the business of creating an experience—one that will keep your customers coming back again and again.

Here are three simple yet powerful steps you can take to improve that experience, and to get your restaurant’s diners back to the table more often.

1. Empower Your Front-of-House Staff

When employees know they have your trust, they’re better able to earn your customers’ trust in turn. Give your servers and other front of house staff the power to make up for minor problems without needing to run it by management, and let them comp a dessert here and there just because.

You can still set the guidelines, but give your waitstaff freedom and flexibility to work within them. Let them know you trust them to make the right choices for your restaurant, and they’ll wear their new empowerment with pride—and translate it into five-star service for each and every table.

2. Make a Better Menu

Davis_Ale_House_MenuToo many dining establishments see menus as a means to an end, rather than a core part of the dining experience. Your menu is your customers’ gateway to everything you have to offer; if it’s unappealing, confusing, or plain old dull, you’re creating low expectations for the entire meal.

There’s no cookie-cutter method to effective menu creation; every restaurant needs to figure out what their clientele wants in their meal and their experience, then design their menu accordingly. With a carefully customized menu, you’ll clue customers in to exactly what they can expect. They’ll be ready for their experience to match up to the menu’s promise.

3. Build a Stronger Brand

Many restaurateurs hear the word “brand” and immediately think of tacky color schemes and logos stamped on every square inch of their building. While logos (used correctly) and color schemes (good ones) are important branding elements, they’re just the beginning.

Effective branding ties everything together, creating a cohesive experience that starts at your restaurant’s exterior and stays strong through service. A strong brand gives you control over how your customers see your business and respond to your marketing efforts, and helps them build a relationship with you rather than seeing you as just one more option when they’re feeling hungry.

A good brand involves everything you do, from menus to decor to how your staff interacts with customers. It informs everything your restaurant does and communicates, during open hours and in your offsite outreach. You can start building a better brand and menu today by getting started with MustHaveMenus, or reading some of our other articles for specific, actionable tips that will take your restaurant wherever you want it to go.

Is your business ready to grow in 2014?

MustHaveMenus Photos in templates food restaurantsSimple menu upgrades make a big impact

The post-holiday lull is the perfect time to consider your goals for the year, and a great opportunity to evaluate your menus. A menu is your most powerful selling tool, so don’t let it be an afterthought. Follow these 5 tips to be sure your menu is really working for you.

1. Update Your Look

If you’ve had your current menu design for a while, think about what could be improved. Want to improve sales by moving desserts or signature cocktails to a table tent? Need to condense your wine list into an easier format? Ready for a new takeout style? Whatever you want to try, our menu experts are standing by to help. Give us a call at 1-800-452-2234.

2. Trim Your Offering

Winter is a great time to look critically at your menu. Which items are hot sellers, and which are duds? Don’t hesitate to remove low-performing items; it will help streamline everything from stock and prep to customer ordering. You’ll also be clearing space to try new items that could become new favorites.

3. Add Visual Appeal

As they say, people eat with their eyes first. Including tempting images of items on your menu can have a measurable impact on sales. But of course, low-quality or unappetizing images will have the opposite effect, so it’s worth investing in quality photos.

4. Get Some Fresh Prints

Are your tabletop menus looking worn out? Stains, creased corners, and torn lamination can distract customers and cheapen the experience. With new prints on our top-notch menu paper, you’ll feel confident that your menus make the best impression. Order prints today and you’ll have new menus on the tables by next week.

5. Sync Changes Everywhere

Whether you’re ready for a new design or a few new items, you’ll want to keep your menus in sync, from tabletop to takeout to online listings. This consistency builds your brand and lets your customers order with confidence. Sync your print menu with your website, Facebook page, and Places mobile menu with just one click at MustHaveMenus.

Tips to Sell More Takeout

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From quick service to fine dining, offering takeout can be a great way to increase business without much overhead. The 2013 Restaurant Industry Forecast found that 33% of adults in the U.S. rely on restaurant takeout. Whether you’re just branching into takeout or giving your takeout menu a makeover, here are some tips to keep in mind.

Takeout should be a separate menu.

Some of your regular menu items may not be suitable for on-the-go, such as hot soups or delicate desserts. Consider what your kitchen can prep in a reasonable time frame (20 minutes max) and package securely. And only include items you can consistently offer; save the seasonal or limited supply dishes for in-house specials. Browse takeout menus.

Takeout menus should build your brand.

Consider your takeout menu an ambassador for your restaurant. Customers will often encounter this menu away from the restaurant environment. Wherever they find it, they should immediately get a feel for your brand. Take cues from your in-house menu and the restaurant atmosphere. Better yet, match your carryout menu to your tabletop menu design with Design Sets. Always include your logo, hours, and complete contact information.

Takeout menus should be published online.

With one click, your takeout menu can be published to Places, MustHaveMenus’ free online business directory. Your mobile-ready takeout menu is synced to your account, and lives online to help diners find you. Then link your Places webpage to other online directories, such as Yelp or UrbanSpoon, and your own website. Your takeout menu will always be current, so diners can order with confidence.

Takeout menus should be professionally printed.

Takeout menus tend to be an afterthought for restaurants, but quality menus promise a quality dining experience. You can easily order professional prints right from your MustHaveMenus account. Keep a stack of trifolds on the counter by the register or hostess stand for guests to grab as they leave. You might even distribute menus in the neighborhood; the vast majority of your clientele live within 5 miles of your business.

15 Common Restaurant Menu Typos

Food words often have tricky spellings, thanks to their far-flung linguistic origins. But typos on menus are distracting to customers and detract from your overall sense of quality dining. Double-check your menu for these common mistakes.

1. caesar

The emperor of salads is a tough one to type. A before e.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos caesar salad

2. bruschetta

This classic Italian appetizer is hard to spell and pronounce (it’s brew-sket-ta), but don’t skip that c in the middle.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos bruschetta

3. homemade

Same goes for housemade – it’s written as a single word.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos homemade

4. tomato / tomatoes

To-may-to, to-mah-to…however you say it, there’s only one correct spelling. That pesky e only makes its appearance in the plural.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos tomato

5. jalapeño

This pepper comes from Mexico, where ñ is a different letter than n. To use this symbol on your menu, find it on the Character Map (on a pc) or Character Palette (Mac), or use Insert > Symbol in Microsoft Word and copy it into your menu.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos jalapeno

6. iced tea

Ice up that tea, and don’t forget the d.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos iced tea

7. vinaigrette

This classic salad dressing is made with vinegar, but not spelled the same.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos vinaigrette

8. aioli

Yes, there are a lot of vowels involved, but sound it out and you’ll get them in the right order.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos aioli

9. breadstick

Nom nom nom. Everyone loves breadsticks. Hitch the words together with no space between.
MustHaveMenus_MenuMustHaveMenus Menu Typos breadstick

10. broccoli

This cruciferous green has a double helping of c – Vitamin C, in fact.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos broccoli

11. ciabatta

Ciao baguettes, ciabatta is the new favorite bread in town.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos ciabatta

12. raspberry

Beware the silent p in these sweet berries.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos raspberry

13. fettuccine

Italian words use double-consonant combos all over the place (mozzarella is another good example), so double-check your spellings.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos fettuccine

14. filet

Like salmon and veal, filet has a single l.
MustHaveMenus Menu Typos filet

15. whipped cream

A whip is the tool you use, but the cream is whipped.
MustHaveMenus_Menu Typos whipped cream

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